Keynote Presenters

 

Keynote Presenters

Leonie Anstey

Leonie Anstey

Keynote: Leveraging student learning progress, resources and practice – (F – Y10)

Jill Brown

Jill Brown

Keynote: Mathematical Modelling in the Victorian Curriculum: Mathematics v2.0 F-10

Katherin Cartwright

Katherin Cartwright

Keynote: I think I already do some of that?': Noticing the now and framing the future of classroom pedagogy (F – Y2)

Doug Clarke

Doug Clarke

Keynote: Drawing Inspiration from the World of the Child (F-4)

Naomi Ingram

Naomi Ingram

Keynote: Growing mathematics teachers and students (Y7 – Y10)

Assoc Prof Jodie Miller

Jodie Miller

Keynote: Computational thinking: What's new and where to start in your primary mathematics classrooms (Y1 – Y6)

Dr Chirssy Monteleone

Chrissy Monteleone

Keynote: Enhancing Students’ Reasoning Through Teacher Questioning (F - Y6)

Wee Tiong Seah

Wee Tiong Seah

Keynote: Supporting our Teachers and Students into the future: Valuing the value of values (F – Y12)

Leonie Anstey is passionate about leadership, mathematics, and numeracy education. She has worked extensively with school districts, systems, and individual schools to enable all educators to make progress towards their mathematics education goals. Leonie holds a Master of Education (Research) based on the skills and knowledge for mathematics teacher coaching. She was formerly a principal in Victoria and has worked extensively as a teacher, principal and coach. Leonie’s teaching background includes secondary, middle years, and primary education. She has also supported early childhood settings in implementing mathematics and science strategies. In her current role as Education Leader at MAV, she works with teachers and leaders to build knowledge, skills and dispositions in mathematics and numeracy. She leads the MAV team to develop resources to support schools to create excellent teaching and learning programs.

Keynote Presentation: Thursday 5 December 2024

Leveraging student learning progress, resources and practice – (F – Y10)

In a learning landscape where there are many resources, options, and opportunities for mathematics lessons, teachers can feel overwhelmed and may lack direction. In this keynote, Leonie will highlight selected excellent resources and offer provocations for your practice. She will share her knowledge of how resources develop a culture of developing and enhancing expertise for teaching and learning in your school or classroom. You will leave with a clear understanding potential decisions and perspectives that can be used to create a balanced and cohesive mathematics program.

Workshop: Thursday 5 December 2024

Questioning techniques to build conceptual understanding of faction concepts (Y5 - Y8)

The use of questioning is a fundamental tool that we know can enhance thinking and student engagement in mathematics learning. If you have wondered different styles of questioning to support student understanding? In this session, Leonie will share questioning tools, lesson concepts that deepen conceptual understanding and build learning proficiency.

Workshop: Friday 6 December 2024

Questioning and dialogue utilising VC2.0 mathematics curriculum? (Primary)

Do you wonder about how explicit teaching in the mathematics classroom, relates to the importance of questioning and dialogue? Do you ponder how \questioning techniques can build feedback and assessment related to the curriculum achievement? This session will use practical hands-on examples related to concepts of rational number and number properties.

Jill Brown is an Associate Professor in mathematics education at Deakin University. Following on from over two decades teaching secondary Mathematics, she has now been involved in primary and secondary Mathematics teacher education for almost as long. She is interested in mathematical thinking including mathematical modelling and reasoning across all levels of schooling. She has a special interest in using multiple representations, digital technology, and classroom discourse to increase opportunities for deep understanding by all learners. She led a team preparing tasks and advice for the new content descriptions related to mathematical modelling in Victorian Curriculum v2.0: Mathematics.

Keynote Presentation: Friday 6 December 2024

Mathematical Modelling in the Victorian Curriculum: Mathematics v2.0 F-10

Mathematical modelling is the process of solving real-world problems. Whilst mathematical modelling has always been part of mathematics, including in the Victorian Curriculum, there is an increased emphasis in the new curriculum (i.e., VC2).

Learning in Mathematics (V2.0) includes the four proficiencies (understanding, fluency, reasoning, and problem-solving) all of which include explicit aspects of mathematical modelling. In addition, for the new curriculum Learning in Mathematics (V2.0) also includes four processes. The processes refer to the thinking, reasoning, communicating, problem-solving and investigation skills involved in working mathematically. The four processes are mathematical modelling, computational thinking and simulation, statistical investigation, and probability experiments and simulations.

In this keynote, Jill will unpack the processes of mathematical modelling. When engaged with mathematical modelling students work together and make decisions about real-world problems. Seeing the usefulness of mathematics in solving real-world problems increases student motivation and engagement. A range of mathematical activities can be used between stages of the modelling process - these will be discussed and illustrated via a diagram of the mathematical modelling cycle. Jill will discuss how mathematical modelling might change what teachers and students are doing in the classroom.

Katherin Cartwright is a passionate mathematics educator and is currently a sessional lecturer and tutor at The University of Sydney teaching pre-service teachers. Katherin's PhD research was on teachers' understanding of mathematical fluency and the characteristics of fluency students' display. She is currently part of a three-year research project focusing on Embodied Learning in Early Mathematics and Science (ELEMS). Katherin is an active member of MANSW (NSW's mathematics association) and is currently president of MANSW and secretary of the PreK-8 PAM committee. Katherin loves teaching and enjoys talking about mathematics, curriculum, and pedagogy. Katherin’s teaching background is with primary-aged students. She has a particular interest in researching mathematics approaches for primary teachers that will have a future impact on classroom practice.

Keynote Presentation: Friday 6 December 2024

'I think I already do some of that?': Noticing the now and framing the future of classroom pedagogy (F – Y2)

In this keynote Katherin will discuss classroom teaching practices and pedagogies that are drawn from research and classroom experiences. She will share pedagogical moves that support students' mathematical proficiencies and present research related to effective pedagogies including an embodied approach to teaching mathematics in the early years. 

Workshop: Friday 6 December 2024

I'd like to do more of that, but what does it look like in practice? (F – Y2)

This workshop builds on Katherin's keynote and relates to creating classrooms that are rich with teachers and students using embodied learning practices and representations to think and communicate mathematically. Katherin will share examples of what these researched pedagogies look like in lesson activities for mathematical concepts such as representing numbers, working with additive strategies, and spatial thinking and reasoning. Participants will engage in these activities and work collaboratively with other participants, snowballing and sharing other ideas and ways to embed embodied learning and representations into their classroom mathematics lessons. 

Doug Clarke is an Emeritus Professor of Mathematics Education at the Australian Catholic University (Melbourne), where he directed the Mathematics Teaching and Learning Centre for 25 years. Doug also directed the Early Numeracy Research Project, exploring effective approaches to numeracy learning in the early years in 70 Victorian primary schools. A more recent project (Learning from Lessons) focused on the ways in teachers took what they learned from a given lesson in preparing for and teaching the following lesson. Doug's professional interests include problem solving and investigations, manageable and meaningful assessment, and the professional growth of mathematics teachers.  Doug enjoys working alongside teachers and students, as they seek to make mathematics relevant, challenging, and enjoyable.

Keynote Presentation: Thursday 5 December 2024

Drawing Inspiration from the World of the Child (F-4)

As we seek to make mathematics relevant, and enjoyable to both teach and to learn, a great place to start is the interests of our children. What is it that really interests our learners? And how might we take those interests and build worthwhile and enjoyable experiences from those. Doug will share many examples that he has used in recent years, drawing upon the interests of primary students and his six grandchildren (four of whom are in early years or junior primary). And we'll have some fun too!

Workshop: Thursday 5 December 2024

Some of My Favourite Maths Problems (Y5 - Y8)

In this workshop, we'll actively work through some maths problems which have the potential to build important connections—connections between the mathematics in the classroom and that of the world outside, and connections within mathematics also. Content addressed will be drawn from geometry, statistics, percentages, and measurement. Participants will leave with several activities ready to use in the following weeks with their students. And we'll have some fun too!

Naomi Ingram is an Associate Professor at the University of Otago and a teacher with a current practising certificate. In recent years, she was on the writing panel for the NZ Ministry of Education's Common Practice Model for Mathematics Teaching, received an Excellence in Teaching award at the University of Otago, and was the national recipient of an Emerging Teacher Educator award. Prior to her current role, she was teaching mathematics in the Sultanate of Oman. Naomi continues to be in direct contact with mathematics associations throughout New Zealand because of her lifetime speaking role for the New Zealand Association of Mathematics Teachers.

Keynote Presentation: Thursday 5 December 2024

Growing mathematics teachers and students (Y7 – Y10)

Naomi, as an experienced-informed and research-informed professional, will describe her own teaching journey in school and university classrooms. She will share her insights into mathematics education, and her discomfort about how teachers are sometimes portrayed in the media. Naomi will highlight the importance of teachers having a positive and robust relationship with mathematics and will suggest ways teachers and students can build a strong sense of the beauty, value, and importance of the subject.

Workshop: Thursday 5 December 2024

The craft of mathematics teaching: Getting the balance right (Y7 - Y10)

We know that students learn mathematics by actively constructing their understanding through challenge, discovery, and discussion. We also know that sudents need time to consolidate their understanding and build their confidence through practice.  This workshop will explore how to achieve this balance.

Associate Professor Jodie Miller is the Deputy Head of School in the School of Education at the University of Queensland. Her teaching and educational research explore best practice in mathematics and STEM education. As a primary school teacher working in culturally diverse school communities, Jodie wanted to understand how students develop conceptual understandings of mathematics and what teaching actions could foster success for all students. Being curious about teaching and learning led Jodie to establish a career in classroom research, where she works with teachers and students to enhance the conditions for mathematics learning. Through this work, Jodie has established a national reputation for her research exploring algebraic thinking, robotics and coding; mathematics learning within families, communities and early years settings; and culturally responsive approaches to supporting Indigenous students’ mathematics learning. A commitment to equity and social justice means Jodie’s research is primarily focused on supporting those most at risk of marginalisation from the school curriculum.

Keynote Presentation: Friday 6 December 2024

Computational thinking: What's new and where to start in your primary mathematics classrooms (Y1 – Y6)

Computational thinking (CT) has emerged as a critical 21st-century skill, prompting its integration into educational curricula worldwide. For many educators, CT represents a novel concept as they navigate ways to nurture students' CT capabilities through the application of its key components: decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition, use of models and simulations, algorithms, and generalizations. In this presentation, we delve into evidence-based practices related to CT activities within primary mathematics. Jodie, through her research with primary school students engaged in a CT project, will share insights and practical implications for fostering both mathematical knowledge and computational thinking simultaneously.

Dr Chrissy Monteleone is a senior lecturer in curriculum and teaching at the Australian Catholic University, where she serves as the Deputy Head of School in Strathfield. With a wealth of experience as an early childhood and primary school educator, Chrissy plays a pivotal role in leading the NSW Partnerships initiative at ACU. She collaborates closely with various schools and sectors as part of her role. Chrissy's research is centered on enhancing critical mathematical thinking capabilities in young children, fostering communities of practice, and mentoring initial teacher education students.

Keynote Presentation: Thursday 5 December 2024

Enhancing Students' Reasoning Through Teacher Questioning (F - Y6)

Critical mathematical thinking (CMT) plays a pivotal role in nurturing students' mathematical reasoning abilities. To facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse during learning, teachers can use specific question types tailored to students. These encompass probing, factual, and guiding questions. In this presentation, Chrissy will offer practical strategies for teachers to foster CMT among students. This involves utilising open-ended questions backed by research and evidence, strategically aimed at enhancing students' reasoning skills.

Wee Tiong Seah is Professor in Mathematics Education at The University of Melbourne. He has more than 25 years of experience in initial teacher education and in-service professional development in Australia, across different tertiary institutions and through state, federal and Catholic education departments respectively. His work has been informed by extensive experience in mathematics teaching and pastoral care across educational settings in Singapore and Australia. Wee Tiong has been interested in how aspects of motivation (especially values) can be developed and/or shaped to optimise students' mathematics learning, and to foster / maintain mathematical wellbeing. He has also been examining how cultural variables are associated with – and can thus be harnessed for – effective mathematics teaching and learning.

Keynote Presentation: Friday 6 December 2024

Supporting our Teachers and Students into the future: Valuing the value of values (F – Y12)

Mathematics learning is most effective when teachers' excellent teaching of mental processes and nurturing of affective states are accompanied by students' motivation and 'want to learn'. What students find important personally – that is, value – in their mathematics learning determines the strength of this motivation. In this session, we will look at how questions like 'why do we have to learn this mathematics?', strong teacher-student relationships, proficiency in mathematics, mathematical wellbeing, and some countries’ persistent domination of international league tables can be better understood from a values perspective. We will also discuss how teachers can foster in students enabling values relating to mathematics learning.

Workshop: Friday 6 December 2024

Facilitating students' embracing of values in the mathematics classroom: The JEDI approach (F – Y12)

While the benefits and significance of students' valuing in mathematics learning may be obvious to many stakeholders, it remains tricky for teachers to facilitate students' embracing of empowering or enabling values. Values often take a long time to be internalised. In this workshop, delegates will be introduced to the JEDI approach to values development, in which the acronym stands for Justifying – Essaying – Declaring – Integrating. The psychological basis of this approach will be outlined. Participants will also have the opportunity to experience the JEDI process themselves during the workshop.